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on c-span "first ladies, influence and image." we'll talk a martha washington followed by the rosa ♪ >> martha washington was george washington's confidante. >> she was very capable. she did not like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so can it be said that everything martha washington did, likewise. >> it was a businesslike relationship. but not without affection. they had a deep respect for each other. >> she owned most of this whole block, going back a couple of acres. she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. >> there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life. she lost her first husband. >> she was raised a rich woman. what that means in the 18th century, that is not necessarily what it means today. >> she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves. that is almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it'd take for 10 days to travel here to valley forge from mount vernon in her carriage with her slaves and servants with her. this was a difficult journey. >> her experience had prepared
. in 1917 during the first world war, he made his first official word on transit trip to washington. it was a baking mission to the u.s. treasury. here are some of the comments that came back. he was rude, dogmatic and this obliging and too offensive for words. these quotes came from the british ambassador and his financial. [laughter] naturally with the americans said was worse. but the question one really has to have their about kings of the diplomat is could anyone have done better for britain with the hand they doll, which which was appalling. i answer perhaps surprisingly is yes, that keynes a bad hand to play, but he played it exactly. let me give you an example appeared in may 1944 before the britain was conference the u.s. financial secretary in washington came excitedly saying the u.s. banking community of new york was launching a rearguard action against the fdr administration and its initiative. they hated the whole idea of a monetary fund. they will offer his $3 billion if we walk away from this scheme that geopolitical terms and keynes turned it down. y? teams for succe
that congress can turn them off any time. washington representative delivered the republican address and called on the president and the senate democrats to negotiate a solution to the automatic spending cuts. >> hi, everybody. on friday i met with leaders from both sides of congress in find a way forward in light of the severe budget cuts, known in washington as the quever that has already started to inflict pain across the country. these cuts are not smart. congress can turn them off at any time as soon as both sides are willing to compromise. as a nation, we've fought back from the worst economic crisis in our lifetimes and we'll get through this too. in a time when your businesses are getting more traction, hiring workers, bringing jobs back to america, the last thing washington needs to do is get in their way. that is what these cuts in research, education, will do. it is unnecessary. in a time when too many of our friends and neighbors are looking for work it is inexcusable. it is importance to thauns not everyone will feel the pain of the cuts right away the pain will be real. many middl
>> george washington enjoyed a long 50 relationship with alexander. >> this gives our visitors a great picture of what the interior of a civil war fort would have looked like. >> alexander was part of the original district of columbia. >> welcome to alexandria, virginia, on booktv. with help of our comcast cable partners, for the next one that we will take you to this down on the potomac river a couple miles south of washington, d.c. join us as we explore its rich and varied history. beginning with a look at some of cities hidden stories from the past. >> the book is "the hidden history of alexandria." the last part of that time is very important because it's not about alexandria, virginia. it's about a period in history when the district of columbia included parts of what's now virginia. what i wanted to do was look at a 50 year time period and give a sense of what alexandria became part of the district of columbia, what went wrong and why it left. one the things i wanted to do with the book is give people a sense of what life was like in this time period. firefighting was ver
but we're teaming with "the washington times." [applause] so we're going to have a wonderful relationship both written and electronic. we as conservatives have a winning message, we just need to get it out there. our pledge to you, whether it is marco rubio or rand paul or from thein or ted cruz great state of texas. we will not block their conservative message. we will be their platform for the message. [applause] so if you would, in conclusion, begin lobbying today for oneamerica so the conservative message will continue to resonate tomorrow. at glimmer just might return to that shining city on the hill. god bless you and thank you. [applause] >> ok, ladies and gentlemen, two present the "the washington times" straw poll results welcome to the stage, larry, president of the "the washington irman." and i.c.u. cha [applause] ♪ >> this is a long awaited moment. tradition a straw poll every year. when i first got started in the ronald reagan days, we use to campaign in the spring, take a break in the summer then after labor day run for office. that is not the case anymore. it sounds like
and said arikat. we will also talk with bill plante. "washington journal" is live at 7 a.m. eastern on c-span. first lad night on " ies" she was called a big ms during her husband's campaign. rachel jackson died of a heart attack before her husband, andrew jackson, went to the white house. the white served as house hostess before a fall out during a scandal. we will include your questions and comments by phone, facebook, and twitter. live monday night on c-span and c-span 3. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. >> in his weekly address, president obama observes the three-month anniversary of the sandy hook elementary school shooting in newtown, connecticut. he speaks of legislation currently being worked on at the senate at attempts to reduce gun violence. then senator mike lee of utah delivers the republican address. he talks about the federal budget and wasteful spending. >> it has been three months since the tragic events in newtown, connecticut. three months since we lost 20 innocent children and six dedicated adult who had so much to give. three months since we as americans be
at twitter.com/booktv. >> well, george washington enjoyed a long 50-year relationship with al sand alexandria. we like to say this is george washington's hometown. >> this gives our visitors a great picture of what the interior of a civil war fort would have leaked like. >> did you know alexandria was part of the original district of columbia? >> welcome to alexandria, virginia, on booktv. with the help of our cable partners, for the next hour we'll take you to this town on the potomac river just a couple of miles south of washington d.c. join us as we explore its rich and varied history through the works of local authors beginning with a look at some of the city's hidden stories from the past. >> book is "hidden history of al alexandria d.c.," and the last part of that title is very important because it's not about alexandria, virginia, or it's about a period in history when the district of columbia included parts of what's now virginia. what i wanted to do was look at this 50-year time period and get a sense of why al sabd drink ya became part of the district of columbia, what went wrong an
and the use of george washington. more recently along with his longtime collaborator, photographer, roger straus, he wrote of the houses of the founding fathers, a book of the same name. he and roger are at it again in a sequel of sorts called houses of the presidents. i so envy hugh howard his research trips. it ask him some time about his visit to bill clinton's boyhood bedroom. hugh howard has turned his attention to the war of 1812 with his new book "mr. and mrs. madison's war," america's first couple in the second war for independence, a history book club selection of the month. most of us have a sort of grade school remembrance of the war of 1812, francis scott key, saving the george washington portrait and that is about it. it was of much more complicated affair. after a time of considerable political division we yankees wanted nothing to do with that war and what a fascinating and diverse cast of characters. chief among them was the diminutive and brilliant james madison and his vivacious and cunning wife, dolley. they were america's first power couple. no doubt the obamas to lear
, but it has particularly changed all my affairs in life. one of the great things about being in washington for me is having grown up here and being a part of a church, and you know so many people who could care less about politics. they are not involved in it. they don't read the magazine i write for "the weekly standard" >> you used to be mean? >> i was very mean. >> explain that. well, i drank a lot. i even smoked a little. i just had a very pessimistic view of the world, and pretty pessimistic view of other people. >> so what was the year that you became, i assumed you said, born again? what year was that? >> 1980. my wife and i both. you know, we decided. my parents prayed for us a lot and talked about their renewed faith, and people they met, they would introduce us to them. at first it had no impact at all. after awhile, it did. once my wife and i decided we would have two daughters. we have four children now. we had two little girls then. we would have them baptized in my parent's church in florida. we thought we were doing my parents a favor. we were doing this for them. my wife, w
for "washington week" is provided by prudential. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. we had an unexpectedly entertaining not to mention consequential week. the topic remain from cabinet nominees to the federal budget all bracketed by good economic news, a record close on wall street as well as more jobs on main street. but at this very time last week, we were being told for the sky to fall as across the board budget cuts took effect. so why the good economic news? >> the numbers that came out friday were positive. 236,000 jobs created across the economy. the private sector even stronger. this is against the backdrop on a bunch of other good news, the stock market making its first new high since 2007. a rare good week for wall street and main street. to keep these in context, neither of these numbers suggest that the economy is racing ahead. in fact, it's still growing at 2 1/2% t
with james madison helping him. >> jim moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scene in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response. >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the president often called her -- called on her to assist him. this sense of the usefulness of diplomacy all-out dali to hit the ball running. she assumed the role in 89 as her husband james madison became the president. welcome. we will learn about the intriguing dolly madison. we have two guests at our table. let me introduce you to them. an author and biographer of dolly madison -- dolley madison. thank you for being here. our other guest was the creator of the first lady's exhibit at the smithsonian. thank you for being here tonight. >> it is a pleasure. >> any 21st century woman who starts to read about dolley madison can see parallels to their own lives. was she ahead of her time? a modern person in the early 1800's's or not? >> that is the p
celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus on dr. king and i have a dream. and i know that -- we all know this and most of us can recite parts of it and chunks of it especially towards the end. it's a great speech. it's optimistic, hopeful, it i
there 50 years ago for the march on washington. they put together a concert for sandy hook elementary survivors, teachers. he has a new album called "i'm in love with a big blue frog." let's take a look at peter paul & mary singing at their 20th anniversary concert. i'm in love with the big blue frog ♪ ♪ paul was here months ago and i have a great conversation with him as always. forever busy. the work does not stopped. the commitment is something we inherited. maryeavers, pete seeger, used to say if you seen, you have to lift me. the turning point came at the march on washington in 1953, and i remember when we were singing, people knew this song. it had been a big hit. us, andvis introduced he said, what should i say? a music groupr that will express music. we were not there to entertain. we were there to express and to join other people. get all of a sudden, a quarter million people were singing the song. ♪ if i had a hammer, i would hammer in the morning, i would hammer in the evening, all over this land ♪ ♪ i would hammer out danger allwould hammer out love and andthis l
of have dominated washington politics. she was head of fdic and champion homeowners during the worst early days of the ongoing economic recession. sheila bair has been looking at the mandated $85 billion cuts and assessing the impact on our country's fragile recovery, which is not much of recovery for so many citizens. sheila bair joins us from washington. >> i am happy to be here. tavis: let me start by asking if this was necessary. it seems like a bad idea. this sequestration process. was it necessary? >> no, we go from one fiscal crisis to the next. the sequestration was designed to be a bad thing. it was designed to be a gun to congress's head to get a long- term fiscal plan in order to put us on a sustainable path. it was meant to be a punitive thing, so members of congress would want to avoid it, but because of the continual this functionality of elected officials, they have not come to a resolution, so now we have sequestration. >> if it was a bad idea to begin with, why would the president of the united states and congress agree to this in the first place? >> i think there is a bro
should do is allow washington politics to get in the way. you deserve better. gridlock is too often passed a serious debate. that is why i have been reaching out to both parties to see if we can untangle some of the gridlock. earlier this week, i met with some republican senators to see if there were smarter ways to grow our economy and reduce the deficit than the arbitrary cuts in the sequester that recently went into place. we had an open and honest conversation about issues like immigration reform and gun violence and other areas where we can work together to move this country forward. next week i will attend both the democratic and republican party meetings in the capital to continue those discussions. the fact is, america is a nation of different beliefs and different points of view. that is part of what makes a strong erie it makes our democratic debates sometimes messy and a lot of the times -- that is what makes us strong. it makes our democratic debates sometimes messy and a lot of the time stressed rating stuff but what binds us together will always be more harmful than wh
in washington state. or washington-altered state. >> what is happening in colorado and washington is truly unprecedented. no country in the world has removed prohibition on commercial production distribution of medical marijuana. >> michael: and one of those marijuana mavens will be joining us on the show tonight. but for tonight, it's gitmo time. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> michael: before we go to gitmo we follow the president. the president is in israel for the first foreign visit in his second term. a visit he has been seemingly avoided. republicans criticized him that he never made it to israel in his first team. he seemed to de-prioritize it, but not the case today. here is obama with someone who he had a prickly if not distant relationship with. >> obama: i did enough the prime minister that they're very good looking young men who clearly got their good looks from their more. >> i could say the same thing of you're daughters. >> michael: when in doubt go to the children and that's what they did to break the ice. you'll remember netanyahu sported romney in the 2012 election. they were very
just a very different type of person than dolley madison. >> explain washington in this time period and how important social was to political. >> well rkt it's interesting. as you said the monroe years are the era of good feeling. i think you could probably take issue with that, particularly the second term. by that point we were close to being a one party state. the old fed ra list party had died off. the war of 1812 had been concluded that most considered a victory. we had established our independence and so it was a period of actually great boom in the country, fiscal expansion. a number of states came into the union during monroe's day. and yet washington city mained this very raw incomplete place with dirt roads. in some ways elizabeth monroe like adams suffers for her strengths. they were both seen as somehow alien. elizabeth was born in this country but in many ways she has her blossoming overseas, na france especially. and the monroes became famous for the frefrpblness with which they approached life in the white house. you can see it in the furniture they bought. you can se
have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. there is something baffling about where we find ourselves in washington tonight. lawmakers spent the better part of the day, and the week, daring each other to meet in the town square at high noon, and when they did, neither liked the outcome all that much. the president popped into the white house briefing room today, at times expressing frustration, other times high mindedness, but making clear who he blames for the budget standoff. >> i am not a dictator. i'm the president. so, ultimately, if mitch mcconnell or john boehner say, we need to go catch a plane, i can't have secret service block the doorway, right? and this idea that somehow there's a secret formula or secret sauce to get speaker boehner or mitc
washington in this time and how important social was to political. >> it is interesting. these years were known as the era of good feelings. you could probably take issue with that in the second term. by that point, we were supposed to be a one-party state. hadold federalist party died off. there was a standoff that most americans were willing to consider a victory. we had established once and for all our independence, and it was a time of actually great boom in the country, a physical expansion, and a number of states came into the union day.ng monroe's washington city remained a very raw, incomplete place with dirt roads. in some ways, elizabeth monroe suffers for her strength. they are both seen as somehow alien. she was born in this country. overseas,r blossoming and france especially. formunroe's became famous the freshness in which they approached life in the white house. and you can see it in the furniture they bought and the food they serve. there was also an element that took exception to a first lady who somehow did not seem quite american enough. >> let's take a look at statist
of these original founding fathers in this country were sort of lifelong and george washington being probably the biggest of all is a young man. he pursued the farming works and he wanted to find the best fertilizer, the best way to prevent come of the best method of cultivation. he owned a lot of land so there was a lot of need for it but this is something that he pursued her about his life. the other part of it is the building of the potomac canal and he was obsessed with it through his presidency to the rest of his life he actually died with the canal not actually finished. he knew he had ideas about it and wanted to hire engineers to help them build it and there were no training engineers. they had to consult engineers in england, and in fact the techniques he used to develop it and up being kind of wrong. he was built with a totally different technique but again something that he pursued what was interested in burr aharoni machine, james madison invented a walking stick with a microscope to invent more organisms on the ground. he was too short for most people. and then i argue that alexa
>> this week on the journal editorial report. the president's plans revealed. "the washington post" confirms it's all about 2014 and a return of a pelosi congress. is that strategy starting to back fire? and plus stocks soaring to new highs, but the economy has a long way to go. has ben bernanke helped create a bubble and will it go bust? also form d.e.a. chiefs putting pressure on the obama administration to block washington and colorado's new laws legalizing pot. weigh in on other state measures, why the silence now? welcome to the journal editorial report. i'm david asman in for paul gigot. despite his so-called charm offensive to republican members of congress this week, "the washington post" confirmed what we already expected, president obama's anti-republican attacks are going to continue, that he's not really in a compromising mood on the budget sequester or pretty much anything else. according to the post, his aim is not to get along with the g.o.p., but to get them out. the goal is to flip the republican-held house back to democratic control, allowing obama it push forward
possibly could i as an historian contribute to the body of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about lincoln or washington probably has been written. the greatest historians have spent years poring through the lettedders and evidence that produced this book on lincoln or the hundreds of books on washington. so my thought was, eureka, why not look at them through the first lady? because historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as they've largely ignored the role of mistresses in shaping the man. why? and i suspect because a lot of my colleagues tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters, and most historians, as i always say, were not educated in matters of the heart or the harte. and so, therefore, they ignore that. so by studying the first lady, for example, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in a lot of outside of philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did is he went shopping. he went shopping for martha, his w
't it be cool if? i'm dr. sanjay gupta, thanks for watching "the next list." >>> washington's forced spending cuts now have the force of law. the u.s. government needs a plan to roo deuce its debt. but is this the way to do it? another deadline, another failure in washington by your elected officials. fay yur to put your prosperity above their ideology and partisan political interests, someone even said the word [ bleep ]. >> we should not have to move a third bill before the senate gets off their [ bleep ] and begins to do something. >> and by senate, he means democrats. but boss reid tossed the hot potato right back at boehner. >> i think he should understand who is sitting on their posterior. we're doing our best to pass something. >> all of this while your financial future hangs in the balance. the forced cuts could cost $750,000 jobs. in a weak economy that's barely growing, a lot of smart people say this so-called sequester is stupid. >> besides having adverse effects on jobs and incomes, a slower recovery would lead to less economic recovery. >> republicans say democrats are fear-among
. and i decided i would do the washington press. press is what we used to call the media. we called it the press at the time. and it was a survey of 450 and then got more elaborate. now, what is terribly interesting to me, this is very exciting. a young woman came up to me a few minutes ago, and she had this book, the original book, because she had just had it reprint inside the back of the shop. by the way, it looks better than the original. i am very excited. and she told me who she was, and she was one of the five interns in the summer of 1978 who did the basic study. diane, she was from stanford. she was toed woman out. the others were all from harvard. and she told me how it changed her life. but she became a writer after that as well. i have several of my interns here now, and i just listen to that story. that's how life goes. and so it got me so interested that i decided that book, i would call it "news work." it would be the first of a series. and it has been such exciting -- the second book was the, took a year inside five government press offices; white house, state depart
't it be nice if we had her back in washington now. >> we only skimmed the surface in 90 minutes of 81 entering years of life. if you want to learn more. i thank the white house historical association for their help in this series. >> next monday night first lady elizabeth monroe was more private than dolley madison. she refused to continue the tradition of making social calls around the city. she spoke french inside the white house and gained a reputation of being queenly by her critics. and louisa katherine adams was the only first lady born outside the u.s. next monday live at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span and c-span 3, also on c-span radio and cspan.org. >> and our website has more about the first ladies including a welcome to the white house. the association is offing the book first ladies of the united states of america. and thoughts from michelle obama on the role of first ladies throughout history now available for the discounted price of $ 12.95 plus shipping at cspan.org slash products. >> now the american public transportation association discusses it's priorities and spending cuts. we
in washington and stand down at the national press club together. this was left, right, center and we all said that any president of the united states, the matter what party they're from, all to have the right to go out and negotiate free trade agreements around the country. everybody came together. we took the issue off the table by working together. similarly, there are specific policies we can work together on. we are doing that now. let's look for more opportunities again to add and multiply, not divide and subtract for the liberty movement. >> amen. thank you raid again, thank you, to you, who are doing the work on our behalf. thank you. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage fox news young conservative mine, -- mind, steven crowder. >> thanks, mom. [laughter] i know it has been a long morning. ?re you folks ready [cheers and applause] are you ready for cpac? that's racist. [laughter] >> a lot of speakers are going over time. we love you, but you're not all that important. we have other speakers coming up. are there any members of armed services are veterans in th
washington bureau chief darren gersh tonight on what happened and what comes next. >> reporter: by now, you know how this story goes. after the last-minute meeting at the white house, the speaker emerges grim-faced. >> the discussion about revenue in my view is over. it's about taking on the spending problem in washington. >> reporter: cut to the white house briefing room. the president says he's been reasonable. some tax cuts, some spending cuts and some entitlement reform. that's his prescription for budgetary pain. and since republicans won't accept it, the president says the middle class is about to feel the pain of those automatic spending cuts known in washington spk as the sequester. >> i don't anticipate a huge financial crisis, but people are going to be hurt. the economy will not grow as quickly as it would have. unemployment will not go down as quickly as it would have and there are lives behind that. and that's real. and it's not necessary, that's the problem. >> reporter: but wait, this movie already has a sequel. march 27, the government runs out of funding and without congres
or sections of the books devoted to other cities like new yorker washington d.c. and potentially have sections on president obama or r. duncan. 1. i was presenting to the advisers of the by ad including the writer people and experience for so propelling -- compelling interest in and around. so i settled on the india of structuring the book around three schools with one person preeminent in each, ms. lurie to made in. all of whom i met in -- at different times and at different ways. citizens writing this book was a journey for me i wanted to talk about what i learned of the course of reporting and writing it apart from the fact that i would make a terrible teacher. the first is that to feel like the extremists and absolutist on both sides of the public conversation over schools the dominant the debate, but their voices don't really capture the needs and desires of those working in the schools. and i had covered education for long enough when i started working on the book to some degree. i was really amazed by the extent to which the ideals and aspirations of many families and front-line educato
to be in a roomful of patriots. we are here in washington at a moment of time. i mean, of course, the sequester. in honor of the sequester, for each of you who went to dinner tonight, your meals were reduced by 2.4%. i can see the looks of hunger and famine in your eyes. i do not know how you are possibly still able to stand on 98.6% of your dinner. i will always be haunted by the site -- sight of newt gingrich's macy is face. it is like ann hathaway in les miserables. other than sequestration, not much is happening in washington. we had an eminence free day in the republican party where rand paul and me were described as wacko birds. when we first heard that, we thought it was a new kind of drone. if standing for liberty and standing for the constitution makes you an wacko bird, then tell to me a proud wacko bird. [cheers and applause] and i think there are more than a few other wacko birds gathered here today. i am going to tell you if, the biggest surprise since coming to washington -- people ask you what surprised you when you came to washington. the biggest surprise has been the defeatist
of washingtons, actually related to washington. he was a business partner of wash. interestingly enough, david stuart laid the corner stone here in 1791 rich chew, the into maws compromise of 1790 sealed the deal with the assumption of debt. after the revolutionary war, there was a whole lot of debt taken on by the various states. .. in exchange for the b. in place right here in the potomac river. for the act of 1790 with the deciding during creating the district of columbia. they came to the spot were standing on now and had a masonic ritual. the masons have dared a burdensome trowel trowels encored audio in the case and speeches right here on the spot. the ceremonial day of the southernmost marker, which is however standing over now. that's how the district was created. >> and 73, someone takes a look at this dodd-frank farmer protection act and argues that took based on a false narrative of what led to the 2008 economic collapse. he spoke about his work at the american enterprise institute in washington d.c. this is just over 90 minutes. >> ladies and gentlemen and welcome to our discussion
the man who is helping the state of washington sort out the complexities of legalizing marijuana. >>> our toptory now, the brunswick, georgia, mother that says a teenaged boy shot and killed her 13 month old baby and just spoke to cnn's nick valencia. nick joins me now from brunswick. nick, two teens have been charged with first degree murder in this case and then 911 recordings have been released, all at a time when you had a sitdown conversation with the mother. >> reporter: yeah, just sat down with sherry west for a very emotional interview, and, fred, she didn't mince words. >> i hate you and i don't forgive you. you killed an innocent human life, and that i hope you die for it. that's how i feel. >> reporter: no one would blame you to feel like that. >> no, because this is the second child that people have taken from me in a tragic way, and that i am so afraid to have any more babies now. i tried to raise really good kids in a wicked world, so i hope he dies for what he did. >> reporter: sherry west says she can't live here anymore. when we visited her armt she was packing up. she sa
administrations that were run by would old presidents. --course, andrew jackson0-- of first, washington's societal ambitions. will washington -- washington's societal ambitions. hear to tell us about those who served in the white house to aupport the presidents, presidential historian. michael, welcome. brady back at our table tonight. her biography of rachel jackson is called "the french your love andrew."rachel and how do people understand the change that andrew jackson brought to the white house? the first westerner. we have virginia presidents from the old south before that. he grew up in the frontier. the change is enormous. socially, the change is enormous. he is not of the old planter class of the south that previous presidents had been from. not like a newly linder either. he brings different values and the french ambitions to the white house. was a widowgh he the president, the ghost of his wife, over the white house during his years there. why is that? >> she was the woman of his life. he loved her. when she died just a few months before he was inaugurated, he was a rest. he spent all of
, washington's already talking about the stock market rally, but not necessarily in the same voice. republicans in congress see the sequester as being one reason for the upturn, but democrats still playing the scare tactic game, at least some of them. just take a listen. >> these are savings that have been anticipated for years, delayed for months, finally arrived last friday. the market responded yesterday with an all-time high. >> wall street is celebrating while the backs of poor people are being broken. >> will, there you have it. anyway, the highlight of "the kudlow report" this evening, my exclusive interview with john boehner. we talked about the chances of a big entitlement deal with president obama, also the plan to keep the government open, and the growing outrage over the obama team's decision to close down white house tours. go figure. anyway, "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> all right. we lead again with wall street's historic bull run. today wall street set another record high closing with 14,296. let's go to our experts. here is andy cross, chief investment officer at th
especially like latin america. >> lawmakers in washington are offering their congratulations as well. >> i'm happy they were able to come to a choice as quickly as they did. i think reaching out beyond the traditional continent of our church is another big step in the right direction for the church. >> the president along with the first lady sent his warm wishes to the new pope tonight. in a statement that reads in part, "i look forward to working with his holiness to advance peace, security and dignity for the fellow human beings, regardless of their faith." we learned tonight the vice president will travel to rome for the pope's installation. >> bret: thank you. let's talk more about the historic day. joining me now is father gerald murray, pastor of the holy family church in new york city. cannon lawyer. he joins us from rome. father murray, first let me get your thoughts on this day. this was a surprise for a lot of people. i was surprised -- it was a wonderful surprise. i was not expecting to see a pope from argentina. but i'm happy for that. argentina and all of la tip america repres
ways. after that a hearing on jobs and the u.s. economy. >> you find washington and silicon valley are on two different planets? >> i think that is fair to say. i think the thais are getting closer. there is a lot more interaction than there was before puree good in many ways the folks in silicon valley did not care -- there was before. in many ways the folks in silicon valley did not care what was happening in washington. >> follow the technology columnist as he tours the consumer electronics show monday night at 8:00 eastern on c-span 2. >> now discussion about politics and public debate surrounding automatic spending cuts. this is about 45 minutes. >> welcome to our sunday round table. we want to welcome will. he is serving as deputy editor. his political reporter. thank you both for being with us. >> thanks for having us. we were asking how you would define the sequestration. >> meh. >> i am going to go with unnecessary. it is difficult to predict at this point of time. at the same time, it was designed to force congress to act, and congress has not acted. we are facing 1.4 tri
anything different when you woke up? we didn't think so. but the forced spending cuts are here. washington calls it the sequester. should you be afraid? it's not armageddon, but it is the opening credits of a very scary movie. here's the horror story the white house is telling. a world more dangerous than it was yesterday. >> what the sequester does, it uses a meat cleaver approach to gut criminal investments. >> the cuts are indiscriminate, some are frightening. less oversight and fewer audits of some nuclear facilities, hampered counterterrorism around the world, fewer food inspections, higher risk of wildfires. fewer hiv tests, a more dangerous border. but it's a horror story not everyone is buying tickets to see. >> i think that the president needs to stop trying to scare the american people, that absolutely, you can cut less than 3% without all these awful consequences. >> reporter: maybe so, in which case, the scariest thing about all of this is that washington is so inept. it's either scary or comical. like the movie "groundhog day." august 2011, a plan to avoid the debt limit pushe
that washington and silicon valley are on two different planets? >> i think that is fair to say. i think that the ties are probably getting closer. there's a lot more interaction these days than before. but i think in many ways, and for a long time, folks in silicon valley didn't care or when to know what was going on in washington. likewise i think people in washington were tone deaf to what is going on in silicon valley and the electronic industry. >> when you talk to tech companies in silicon valley, what i do they say about washington? that you can report. >> i think it depends on which companies you're talking about. in some cases, technology executives want washington to stay the hell out. keep it hands off. in some cases, technology companies want certain steps from washington. they would like more spectrum for the mobile phone industry. in some cases, again, for washington to not regulate. there was a big up roar about various kind of things regarding privacy or whatever. it is a divided message coming out of silicon valley. it depends on the issue. in some cases they want the go
washington's solidarity. >> today, i want to tell you -- particularly the young people, so that there is no mistake here -- so that there -- so long as there is a united states of america [speaking hebrew] >> words meaning "you are not alone." >> our correspondent is in jerusalem. she was there for president obama's speech. she joins us now from jerusalem. what would you say? did the president hit all the right buttons for his audience? >> i think for the audience that was in the convention center for the speech, a lot of people said it was a very courageous speech. the main aim of the visit was to please the public. he also called on them to really go for peace, and he encouraged especially young people to push for that. he said it is so important in the region, especially at a time when everything around israel is so chaotic. >> president obama's visit obviously not just for the israelis. earlier in the day, he was in the west bank. how was he received? >> i think it takes much more to convince the palestinian public, at least, of what he wants to really do. they have bee
a man alive while he slept. >>> can those massive washington cuts be here to stay. >>> guitar legend jimmi hendrix has a new album out. >>> good morning. doctors are calling it a game-changer in the fight against hiv. a baby with hiv is functionally cured with the disease that causes aids. she's now 2 1/2 years old. and has been off medication for about a year. if further studies show similar results in infants health experts are expected to recommend the treatment globally. >> if you could treat early enough before the virus can establish a formation, the pediatric model is the exact model. this has very important implications for hiv infection. we think it should be able to replicate this. >> in 2007, timothy brown became the first person believed to have recovered from hiv. his infection was cleared through a treatment of leukemia. >>> the demolition of the florida home will be finished. most of the structure will be taken sunday. they need to see the entire sinkhole before deciding how to proceed. jeff bush disappeared when the sinkhole opened up. he's presumed dead. >>> talks ar
corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. some weeks demand more analysis than others. white house tours were canceled but it wasn't about that. republicans and democrats issued competing budget blueprints but it wasn't about that either. what it seemed to be about as self-definition, a sudden recognition that in the eyes of the american people they've been doing it all wrong, so the president went repeated by to capitol hill. >> over the last several weeks the press here in washington has been reporting about obama's charm offensive. all i've been doing is just calling up folks and trying to see if we can break through some of the gobbledygook of our politics here. at this juncture one of the things i believe is that we've got to get members of congress involved in these discussions, not just leadership. gwen
supposed to happen are now the law. so what comes next? ali velshi is live from washington for a special live e e edition of "your money." e edition of "your money." i'm fredricka whitfield. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> washington's forced spending cuts now have the force of law behind them. i'm ali velshi. there's broad consensus over the long term the government needs a plan to reduce its debt. is this the way to do it? another deadline, another failure in washington by your elected officials. failure to put your prosperity above their ideology and partisan political interests. someone even said the word [ bleep ]. >> we should not have to move a third wheel before the senate gets off their [ bleep ] and begins to do something. >> and by senate, he meant democrats. but boss reid tossed the lame hot potato right back. >> he should understand who is sitting on their posterior. we're doing our best to pass something. >> all this while your financial future hangs in the balance. the forced cuts could cost $750,000. in a weak economy that's barely growing, a lot of smart people
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